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Zionism and the Foundations of Israeli Diplomacy

Zionism and the Foundations of Israeli Diplomacy

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Sasson Sofer
Cambridge University Press, 5/21/1998
EAN 9780521630122, ISBN10: 0521630126

Hardcover, 464 pages, 22.9 x 15.2 x 3 cm
Language: English

Detailed historical reconstruction of the origins of Jewish political thought. By tracing the development of Socialist Zionism and Revisionism in the years prior to Israel's independence, the book demonstrates how the political, social and economic foundations of the future state of Israel were negotiated in this period and how these ideologies have endured and are reflected in Israeli diplomacy. In this respect, the comprehensive analysis is key to an understanding of the basis of Israeli international relations and the fragmentary nature of its politics. The book promises to become a standard reference for students of Zionist and Israeli politics, as well as those interested in the Middle East generally.

Preface
Glossary
Part I. Setting the Scene
1. Ideas and the course of history
2. Israeli society and politics before Independence
3. A remarkable and terrible decade
Part II. Appearances and Reality
4. The political world of the founding fathers
5. The vicissitudes of hegemony
6. The revolutionary maximalists
7. The reluctant vanguard
8. The lost avant-garde
9. The Communists - in captivity
Part III. The Fallacies of Realpolitik
10. Jabotinsky and the Revisionist tradition
11. The revolt
12. The mysticism of realism
Part IV. Sectarian Interests and a Façade of Generality
13. The General Zionists
14. The farmers and the Sephardi notables
Part V. God's Dispositions
15. Religious natlionalism
16. Religious orthodoxy and the cult of separateness
Part VI. The Boundaries of the Intelligentsia
17. Canaanites and Semites
18. Magnes, Buber and Ihud (Unity)
19. The divided heritage
Israel's diplomatic tradition
Notes
Index.

‘… Sofer has done an excellent job. In elegant, graceful prose, he paints a penetrating portrait of pre-state politics, from the right to the Communists on the far-left, illustrating the process by which David Ben-Gurion and his particular faction of the Labour movement achieved hegemony.’ Itamar Rabinovich, Haa´retz and Herald Tribune

‘… dispassionate, sober account … meticulously researched and succinctly written.’ Political Studies