>
Civic Monuments and the Augustales in Roman Italy

Civic Monuments and the Augustales in Roman Italy

  • £22.29
  • Save £63


Margaret L. Laird
Cambridge University Press
Edition: Illustrated, 9/15/2015
EAN 9781107008229, ISBN10: 1107008220

Hardcover, 364 pages, 26.2 x 18.2 x 2.5 cm
Language: English

The combination of portrait statue, monumental support, and public lettering was considered emblematic of Roman public space even in antiquity. This book examines ancient Roman statues and their bases, tombs, dedicatory altars, and panels commemorating gifts of civic beneficence made by the Augustales, civic groups composed primarily of wealthy ex-slaves. Margaret L. Laird examines how these monuments functioned as protagonists in their built and social environments by focusing on archaeologically attested commissions made by the Augustales in Roman Italian towns. Integrating methodologies from art history, architectural history, social history, and epigraphy with archaeological and sociological theories of community, she considers how dedications and their accompanying inscriptions created webs of association and transformed places of display into sites of local history. Understanding how these objects functioned in ancient cities, the book argues, illuminates how ordinary Romans combined public lettering, honorific portraits, emperor worship, and civic philanthropy to express their communal identities.

Part I. Representation in the Funerary Realm
1. VIVIR AVG IDEM QQ
text, image, and context
2. Ob honorem bisellii
the grammar of representation
Part II. Augustales in Their Meeting Places
3. Templum Augusti quod est Augustalium
municipal and private Augustea
4. Curia Augustiana
civic standing and the Collegio degli Augustali at Herculaneum
5. Res communis Augustalium
group identity in the Sacello degli Augustali at Misenum XXX
6. Ob Eximiam Benivolentiam
donors and Augustales in second-century Misenum
Part III. Monuments in Public
7. In statuas ponendas
sculpting a public persona
8. In vias sternendas
paving your way in the Roman town
Conclusions.