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First Exposure to a Second Language: Learners' Initial Input Processing

First Exposure to a Second Language: Learners' Initial Input Processing

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Cambridge University Press
Edition: Illustrated, 9/29/2014
EAN 9781107017610, ISBN10: 1107017610

Hardcover, 220 pages, 23.1 x 15.7 x 1.8 cm
Language: English

The initial state of learner spontaneous input processing in foreign language learning, as well as the extent to which this processing leads to intake, is of central importance to theoreticians and teachers alike. In this collection of original studies, leading experts examine a range of issues, such as what learners do when faced with a language they know little or nothing about, what factors appear to mediate beginning learners' processing of input, how beginners treat two types of information - form and meaning - in the input, and how adult cognition deals with stimulus frequency at this initial stage. This book provides a microscopic view on learners' processing of foreign language input at the early stages of learning, and evaluates a variety of methodological options within the context of ab initio processing of foreign languages other than English, such as German, Korean, Norwegian, Polish, and Spanish.

Introduction. First exposure, input processing and theorizing ZhaoHong Han and Rebekah Rast
1. First exposure
a replication of Han and Peverly (2007) ZhaoHong Han and Yayun Sun
2. Learners' first exposure to written L2 input
insights from learners' spontaneous think-alouds Eun Sung Park
3. Initial processing and use of inflectional markers
evidence from French adult learners of Polish Rebekah Rast, Marzena Watorek, Heather Hilton and Ellenor Shoemaker
4. Processing 'words' in early-stage foreign language acquisition
a comparison of first exposure and low proficiency learners S. E. Carroll
5. Absence of morphological transfer in beginners
evidence from eye tracking Nuria Sagarra
6. The challenges of establishing spontaneous allocation of attention to meaning and form Nina Moreno
Epilogue. Input processing by novices
issues in the nature of processing and in research methods Bill VanPatten.