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From Ostpolitik to Reunification: West German-Soviet Political Relations since 1974: 85 (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies, Series Number 85)

From Ostpolitik to Reunification: West German-Soviet Political Relations since 1974: 85 (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies, Series Number 85)

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Avril Pittman
Cambridge University Press
Edition: Revised ed., 11/26/2010
EAN 9780521893336, ISBN10: 052189333X

Paperback, 246 pages, 22.8 x 15.2 x 1.6 cm
Language: English

With the signing of the Moscow Treaty in 1970, West German-Soviet relations came to the forefront of world politics. Two decades later, the historic opening of the Berlin Wall and German reunification once again focused world attention on the Federal Republic's relations with the USSR. This book explores the development of this relationship from the perspective of West Germany. Dr Avril Pittman outlines the main events after the Second World War and then focuses on four issues central to this relationship in the 1970s and early 1980s. She explores family reunification and emigration rights for ethnic Germans living in the Soviet Union; the central role of Berlin and the reasons why the city persisted as a serious bilateral problem; the triangular relations between West Germany, the Soviet Union and East Germany; and the significance of the Soviet intervention in Afghanistan which led to a sharp deterioration in East-West relations.

List of tables
Preface
Note on text
Chronology
Introduction
1. The Second World War and its aftermath, 1945–1974
2. Ethnic Germans
3. Berlin
4. The Federal Republic of Germany's relations with the German Democratic Republic
5. INF, Afghanistan and the post-Afghanistan period
6. Assessment of the Federal Republic of Germany's relations with the Soviet Union, 1974–1982
7. The Federal Republic of Germany's political relations with the Soviet Union after 1982
Appendices
Notes
Bibliography
Index.

"This book should interest specialists and students of German and Soviet foreign policy as well as students of international relations." Ieuan G. John, Times Higher Education Supplement

"The book's major strength is the empirical discussion of Schmidt's Ostpolitik and its four central concerns: the situation of ethnic Germans, the status of Berlin, West Germany's relationship with East Germany and the twin impact of the decision to deploy American intermediate-range weapons in Germany and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan on FRG-Soviet ties." Angela Stent, Slavic Review